Friday, July 23, 2010

Allergy Tales Giveaway


Allergy Tales over at Allergies On Board Is Hosting this giveaway.

To win the newest addition of the Allergy Tales series:
Making Friends, tell us how you've helped your child to understand and manage their allergies effectively, without stigma or negativity.

The children's book series, Allergy Tales, uses rhyme and real-life situations to teach children how to navigate challenging situations in a positive effective manner.



Learn more about Allergy Tale Books Contest ends August 1, 2010.

16 comments:

Denise S. said...

My own kids don't have allergies, but I have a friend who's kid have lots of them and she struggles to make sure they feel normal. The school wanted to put her son in the 'allergy class' and she insisted he be allowed in a regular class.

Grace said...

We just present it as part of life - just like some people have blue eyes and some have brown or green. Its just a part of who you are and you have to take care of yourself. My child has never accepted food from anyone - even at two years old. She was taught to ALWAYS ask mom, dad, or grandmother first. Self reliance is the best thing you can teach your food allergic child in my opinion - how to care for themselves.

Anonymous said...

We discuss the situation frequently.

theyyyguy@yahoo.com

Ann said...

We are constantly educating our children about their food allergies. We have simple rules that they can understand. When I say "knuckles" for example, it is a simple reminder to rub their eyes (if they have to) with their knuckles instead of their finger tips. "Hands down" means to take their hands off the railings or push thru the turn-style without touching it. Unfortunately, we have had far too many swollen eyes from touching them and everything else. They understand that they are different but, that we are all unique and special in some way.

4 is crazy said...

We present it as "this is how God made you" and He does not make mistakes. It helps that 3 of the 4 kids in the family, plus me, all have food allergies. We have a built in support group ;')

cdmarteny said...

my son has allergies,asthma this would be good for him and friends

Lisa DeLong said...

We are working on this daily. My child simply says "I have food allergies and contact allergies please ask my mom if I can have that" As far she understanding herself if she can have something or use something she either ask me or doesn't take or use it. When it comes to my 2 year old he still doesn't understand so it is more difficult.

MommyAndHerTwins said...

It was easy! Much easier than I thought! My Twins eat mostly Soy Product and NEVER SUGAR! If they think it is sugar...they say, "No thank you, I don't eat sugar!" Since I tried my best to teach them to eat Healthy from the beginning. This was just another food, that was added to the "NOT Healthy List, for Me!"

If you teach healthy from the beginning, I feel they understand when you have to change their diet, to keep them healthy!!!

Katie said...

My son will be three in a couple of weeks, so we have just begun building awareness about his milk allergy. (He recently outgrew peanuts and eggs! Yay!) We have made it a family choice to only eat foods that he can have in our home, so he doesn't feel different. We do our homework to find out what he can enjoy when we are out of the house. It is our goal to make him aware, without making him feel like there is something wrong with him.

Chrissy said...

MommyAndHerTwins said...

It was easy! Much easier than I thought! My Twins eat mostly Soy Product and NEVER SUGAR! If they think it is sugar...they say, "No thank you, I don't eat sugar!" Since I tried my best to teach them to eat Healthy from the beginning. This was just another food, that was added to the "NOT Healthy List, for Me!"

If you teach healthy from the beginning, I feel they understand when you have to change their diet, to keep them healthy!!!

melissa said...

Our daughter is galactosemic, do dairy is fatal. Much worse than a tummy ache, rash or puffy face.

We explain to her that some foods can make her really sick. We also educate her care providers, etc.

We pack foods to parties, and get togethers and always bring her a yummy vegan or parve cupcake. That keeps her happy, but as she gets older, we may need to be more creative

Jenny G said...

My children are too young to explain, but I try to normalize their allergies. We also have many friends and family with similar allergies so that helps, too.

Bethany S. said...

It's really the only way of life they've known, so it doesn't seem any different to them. But we help our sons feel as normal as possible by including them in as much as possible. For example, I am the head room mom at school so I can control the food at celebrations; the other kids don't know that their cupcakes are allergen free, and my sons don't stand out with a different food or feel excluded with no food.

We try to educate them about their FAs as much as possible. I was so proud of my 6-year-old--just today he was offered food at church and said "No, thank you" very politely. We weren't around, but his teacher recounted the story to us. (The teacher checked with us beforehand, and the food was safe.) We know we can trust him when we're not there since we discuss the subject frequently. By being informed, he is not scared or intimidated by his situation.

Anonymous said...

I think the fact that my daughter can see for herself how much better she feels when she's milk free, helps. Plus we've figured out a lot of alternatives and substitutions that keep her happy. This children's book will be for great kids who don't know anyone with a similar situation. What a great book to share with their classmates!

Tracy Mc said...

I would love this storybook for my 4 year old son. He will be starting school in September and it would be a good book for him to share with his classmates.

Jenni said...

Our daughter is only one, so we've been working hard with the grandparents to make sure that when she's not directly with us, someone else can help watch what foods she accepts. My in-laws recently had a big "group birthday party" and had special ice cream and cake for us that looked just like everyone else's so she was so happy! I would love this book, because I could read it to her little cousins and help them understand why offering her cookies without asking an adult isn't nice. (They're just trying to share, and they're small too so it's really a challenge!)